“I have been in the classroom for 22 years, both as a student and as a teacher. The Hypnotherapy Academy is the very best possible learning environment ever! The knowledge and expertise of the instructors are equally matched with their enthusiasm, clarity and humor. I found no other program that provides such comprehensive and thorough hypnosis training. The personal growth I experienced in THIS NURTURING ENVIRONMENT WAS PROFOUND!”
“Learning hypnotherapy does not commit you to drastically changing your therapy practice,” says hypnotherapist Catherine Reiss. “The training will allow you to more quickly and effectively get to the cause of your clients’ unwanted behaviors and the feelings they present with it, but it also facilitates the use of trance in more traditional formats.”
Jump up ^ Lynn, Steven Jay; Green, Joseph P.; Kirsch, Irving; Capafons, Antonio; Lilianfeld, Scott O.; Laurence, Jean-Roch; Montgomery, Guy (October 2015). "Grounding hypnosis in science: The 'new' APA Division 30 definition of hypnosis as a step backward". American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis. 57 (4): 390–401. doi:10.1080/00029157.2015.1011472. PMID 25928778.
The British Psychological Society commissioned a working group to survey the evidence and write a formal report on hypnotherapy in 2001. They found, “Enough studies have now accumulated to suggest that the inclusion of hypnotic procedures may be beneficial in the management and treatment of a wide range of conditions and problems encountered in the practice of medicine, psychiatry and psychotherapy.”

He also believed that hypnosis was a "partial sleep", meaning that a generalised inhibition of cortical functioning could be encouraged to spread throughout regions of the brain. He observed that the various degrees of hypnosis did not significantly differ physiologically from the waking state and hypnosis depended on insignificant changes of environmental stimuli. Pavlov also suggested that lower-brain-stem mechanisms were involved in hypnotic conditioning.[166][167]

As part of the comprehensive education we offer, our students get valuable hands-on training in the various Specialty Clinics that are open to the public. Hypnotherapy is one of these holistic healing modalities scheduled at specific times at Southwest Institute of Healing Arts. Sessions generally last one hour and the Hypnotherapy Clinic is completely complimentary.
Cally Stewart, OTD, OTR/L, CH joined the Center for Healthy Living in January 2017.  She was certified in hypnotherapy in 2009 and has practiced in a variety of health care settings including cancer care, family medicine, rehabilitation from injury or surgery, and chronic disease self-management.  Cally has a B.A. in psychology from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri.  She received her master's and doctorate in occupational therapy at Tufts University and is a licensed occupational therapist in Massachusetts.  She also holds a certification in hypnotherapy through the International Association of Counselors and Therapists. 
Hypnosis may be useful as an adjunct therapy for weight loss. A 1996 meta-analysis studying hypnosis combined with cognitive behavioural therapy found that people using both treatments lost more weight than people using cognitive behavioural therapy alone.[142] The virtual gastric band procedure mixes hypnosis with hypnopedia. The hypnosis instructs the stomach that it is smaller than it really is, and hypnopedia reinforces alimentary habits. A 2016 pilot study found that there was no significant difference in effectiveness between VGB hypnotherapy and relaxation hypnotherapy.[143]
Stand or sit face-to-face. Look into the eyes of the person. Have the person place their hand on top of yours palm to palm. Tell your subject to continue to look into your eyes until you tell them to stop. Pause and tell the subject that you will count to three and that on three they need to press down on your hand and that you will press up against theirs. Explain that what they feel is your energy. Then command them to listen to your instructions.

Once the person is in the trance state, and is in a safe seated position, you can use the power of suggestion on your hypnotized subject. For example, you can tell them that when you count to three that they will open their eyes but that they will not remember their name. Then count to three and tell them to open their eyes. When their eyes are open, ask them to tell you their name. They will be amazed that they can't remember their own name.


Hypnosis is not a dangerous procedure. It is not mind control or brainwashing. A therapist cannot make a person do something embarrassing or that the person doesn't want to do. The greatest risk, as discussed above, is that false memories can potentially be created and that it may be less effective than pursuing other, more established and traditional psychiatric treatments.

A typical hypnotherapy session has the patient seated comfortably with their feet on the floor and palms on their lap. Of course, the patient could choose to lie down if that option is available and if that will meet the patient's expectation of hypnosis. The therapist can even set the stage for a favorable outcome by asking questions like, "Would you prefer to undergo hypnosis in this chair or on the sofa?" Once patients make the choice, they are in effect agreeing to undergo hypnosis. Depending on the approach used by the therapist, the next events can vary, but generally will involve some form of relaxing the patient. Suggestions will lead the patient to an increasingly relaxed state. The therapist may wish to confirm the depth of trance by performing tests with the patient. For example, the therapist may suggest that when the eyes close that they will become locked and cannot be opened. The therapist then checks for this by having patients try to open their eyes. Following a successful trial showing the patient's inability to open the eyes, the therapist might then further relax them by using deepening techniques. Deepening techniques will vary for each patient and depend largely on whether the patient represents information through auditory, visual, or kinesthetic means. If the patient is more affected by auditory suggestions, the therapist would use comments such as "You hear the gentle patter of rain on the roof;" or, "The sound of the ocean waves allow you to relax more and more." For the visual person, the therapist might use statements such as, "You see the beautiful placid lake, with trees bending slightly with the breeze." Finally, with the kinesthetic person phrases such as, "You feel the warm sun and gentle breeze on your skin," could be used. It is important for the therapist to know if the patient has difficulty with the idea of floating or descending because these are sometimes used to enhance the experience for the patient. However, if the patient has a fear of heights or develops a feeling of oppression with the thought of traveling downward and going deeper and deeper, suggestions implying the unwanted or feared phenomenon will not be taken and can thwart the attempt.


Sometimes those shoulds and shouldn'ts seem to only take us so far, before we reach a seemingly insurmountable hurdle that even the strongest willpower just can't quite conquer. This is because we're trying to address these issues on a purely conscious level, which is similar to applying a bandaid over an internal wound. Sooner or later, we need to deal with the root cause.
Preliminary research has expressed brief hypnosis interventions as possibly being a useful tool for managing painful HIV-DSP because of its history of usefulness in pain management, its long-term effectiveness of brief interventions, the ability to teach self-hypnosis to patients, the cost-effectiveness of the intervention, and the advantage of using such an intervention as opposed to the use of pharmaceutical drugs.[91]
The next major development came from behavioural psychology in American university research. Clark L. Hull (1884–1952), an eminent American psychologist, published the first major compilation of laboratory studies on hypnosis, Hypnosis & Suggestibility (1933), in which he proved that hypnosis and sleep had nothing in common. Hull published many quantitative findings from hypnosis and suggestion experiments and encouraged research by mainstream psychologists. Hull's behavioural psychology interpretation of hypnosis, emphasising conditioned reflexes, rivalled the Freudian psycho-dynamic interpretation which emphasised unconscious transference.
At the outset of cognitive behavioural therapy during the 1950s, hypnosis was used by early behaviour therapists such as Joseph Wolpe[71] and also by early cognitive therapists such as Albert Ellis.[72] Barber, Spanos, and Chaves introduced the term "cognitive-behavioural" to describe their "nonstate" theory of hypnosis in Hypnosis, imagination, and human potentialities.[35] However, Clark L. Hull had introduced a behavioural psychology as far back as 1933, which in turn was preceded by Ivan Pavlov.[73] Indeed, the earliest theories and practices of hypnotism, even those of Braid, resemble the cognitive-behavioural orientation in some respects.[69][74]

Speech, on account of the whole preceding life of the adult, is connected up with all the internal and external stimuli which can reach the cortex, signaling all of them and replacing all of them, and therefore it can call forth all those reactions of the organism which are normally determined by the actual stimuli themselves. We can, therefore, regard "suggestion" as the most simple form of a typical reflex in man.[165]


It would be difficult to find an area of scientific interest more beset by divided professional opinion and contradictory experimental evidence…No one can say whether hypnosis is a qualitatively unique state with some physiological and conditioned response components or only a form of suggestion induced by high motivation and a positive relationship between hypnotist and subject…T.X. Barber has produced "hypnotic deafness" and "hypnotic blindness", analgesia and other responses seen in hypnosis—all without hypnotizing anyone…Orne has shown that unhypnotized persons can be motivated to equal and surpass the supposed superhuman physical feats seen in hypnosis.[148]
The British Psychological Society commissioned a working group to survey the evidence and write a formal report on hypnotherapy in 2001. They found, “Enough studies have now accumulated to suggest that the inclusion of hypnotic procedures may be beneficial in the management and treatment of a wide range of conditions and problems encountered in the practice of medicine, psychiatry and psychotherapy.”
The American Society of Clinical Hypnosis (ASCH) is unique among organizations for professionals using hypnosis because members must be licensed healthcare workers with graduate degrees. As an interdisciplinary organization, ASCH not only provides a classroom to teach professionals how to use hypnosis as a tool in their practice, it provides professionals with a community of experts from different disciplines. The ASCH's missions statement is to provide and encourage education programs to further, in every ethical way, the knowledge, understanding, and application of hypnosis in health care; to encourage research and scientific publication in the field of hypnosis; to promote the further recognition and acceptance of hypnosis as an important tool in clinical health care and focus for scientific research; to cooperate with other professional societies that share mutual goals, ethics and interests; and to provide a professional community for those clinicians and researchers who use hypnosis in their work. The ASCH also publishes the American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis
The person will immediately slump over and perhaps fall to you. It is important that you bring them close to you and guide them to your shoulder, turning their head to rest comfortably. It is important not to let them get hurt by falling on you. Now rub their back and say, "That's good, that's good. Now relax. Just feel yourself relax. You are fine." By reassuring them you give them a feeling it is all going to be okay. It is a very good idea to have a person help you seat them in a chair or lay them on a bed or sofa.

     "This is to thank you for allowing me to take the 4 full Level classes again and be a diligent analyst of your unparalleled methods. Taking the full course again has been most insightful and rewarding on both professional and personal levels. Although the program foundation is similar, the cases and studies in class have been rewardingly new and inspiring to me.
My girlfried hopefully to be wife some day has a really big bad temper issue. She blows up for nothing. I know she loves me but shes had so many bad experiences in her life that now affects our relationship. I trully love this woman and i would like to do something like put her in a trance and suggest to be in peace without her knowing. Can this be done. She is a very smart woman, but very proude and untrusting for everything.. please let me know.

The American Psychological Association published a study comparing the effects of hypnosis, ordinary suggestion, and placebo in reducing pain. The study found that highly suggestible individuals experienced a greater reduction in pain from hypnosis compared with placebo, whereas less suggestible subjects experienced no pain reduction from hypnosis when compared with placebo. Ordinary non-hypnotic suggestion also caused reduction in pain compared to placebo, but was able to reduce pain in a wider range of subjects (both high and low suggestible) than hypnosis. The results showed that it is primarily the subject's responsiveness to suggestion, whether within the context of hypnosis or not, that is the main determinant of causing reduction in pain.[138]
Look into the person's eyes you are placing into trance. Maintain your gaze into their eyes as you lower your face downward always keeping eye contact. Then place your palm on theirs telling them to push down on your upward facing palm. As they do withdraw your hand quickly away and order them to "SLEEP". As they fall into trance it is up to you to reassure them they are okay and to then place them into a seated position.

The real origin and essence of the hypnotic condition, is the induction of a habit of abstraction or mental concentration, in which, as in reverie or spontaneous abstraction, the powers of the mind are so much engrossed with a single idea or train of thought, as, for the nonce, to render the individual unconscious of, or indifferently conscious to, all other ideas, impressions, or trains of thought. The hypnotic sleep, therefore, is the very antithesis or opposite mental and physical condition to that which precedes and accompanies common sleep
Mr Burrow, u r good. Miracles do happen. Thank-u so much for changing my life for the better. Like u told me, I won't have another cigarette once I leave ur office, and I haven't. I like having the CD u sent home with me, I have listened to it once, it just makes me feel better to know I have that if I need it. I have gone from over a pack of cigarettes a day, to nothing. In all aspects, I feel so much better. Thank- u again for changing my life. My Husband wants to know if u can put a suggestion in for my shopping. Lol. No thank u.

It is far easier to describe what hypnosis is not rather than to describe what it is. For example, it is not one person controlling the mind of another. The patient is not unconscious and does not lose control of his or her faculties. People will not do things under hypnosis that they would be unwilling to do otherwise. The person being hypnotized is always in control. The hypnotized person decides how deep the trance will be, what suggestions will be accepted, and when to awaken. Therefore, a hypnotyized person cannot be forever "lost" if the therapist should fall dead during an induction or while the patient is deep in trance.

Adverse events resulting from relaxation techniques are uncommon. Rare reports describe basilar or vertebral artery occlusion after yoga postures that put particular strain on the neck. People with poorly controlled cardiovascular disease should avoid progressive muscle relaxation because abdominal tensing can cause the Valsalva response. Patients with a history of psychosis or epilepsy have reportedly had further acute episodes after deep and prolonged meditation.


     "This is to thank you for allowing me to take the 4 full Level classes again and be a diligent analyst of your unparalleled methods. Taking the full course again has been most insightful and rewarding on both professional and personal levels. Although the program foundation is similar, the cases and studies in class have been rewardingly new and inspiring to me.
Jump up ^ The revised criteria, etc. are described in Yeates, Lindsay B., A Set of Competency and Proficiency Standards for Australian Professional Clinical Hypnotherapists: A Descriptive Guide to the Australian Hypnotherapists' Association Accreditation System (Second, Revised Edition), Australian Hypnotherapists' Association, (Sydney), 1999. ISBN 0-9577694-0-7.
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